Arkansas Part 3. From Oark and On

From the point you reach Oark, the rest of Arkansas starts to get pretty real.

IMGP0384
This part of the trail has so far been one of my favorites. Oark is a small town in the middle of the mountains, with one place to eat called the Oark Cafe. People travel to visit this little restaurant in the mountains, we got some amazing food here. The place was bustling when we arrived, this is what those chain restaurants that hang goofy things on the walls wants to be, they will never compare.

IMGP0382
After being out of commission a couple of days due to a burned out clutch, we were driven straight back into the thick of it with some pretty intense mountain climbs and switchbacks, and the ozarks version of shelf roads. There was plenty of interesting rock formation in the area and cave systems all about if you know where to find them (we didn’t, but heard tale)

IMGP0387
There was a point where you’re going down a bit of a rock scramble on what looks to be the path of a dry creek bed. Going into this road a farmer on a tractor gave us the side eye, and probably thought we were fools. If you take your time, you should be fine though. Larger vehicles may have a little trouble here since the trees and vegetation grow in pretty tight, you’ll have yourself some tiger stripes by the end of it though.

IMGP0403(not the best picture)
We crashed at Devils Den state park and explored the trails a bit and did some runs. This is a beautiful park and they have Wifi at the pavilion. The caves are all off limits due to a disease the bats have. Apparently all caves in the US are supposed to be closed for this reason and have been for five years.

IMGP0418IMGP0422

We climbed and climbed, and at long last we can see the plains reaching ahead of us.

IMGP0400

Advertisements

3 Comments Add yours

  1. The DC says:

    Sounds/looks like some awesome driving,my friends! I wouldn’t worry about “tiger stripes” on my old Jeep,we call em “trail tats” 😛

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Rob says:

    In NJ, we call them piney stripes.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s